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Cook County Board of Education 
1109 North Parrish Avenue 
Adel, Georgia 31620 
Policy EEE

 The Cook County Board of Education (CCBOE) will be taking the lead in limiting student access to unhealthy snacks and beverages as part of our CCBOE Initiative for Healthy Children. The Beverage Companies will begin restocking all our beverage machines on all campuses with healthier drinks, including water, sports drinks, etc. and juices w/ minimum of 10% juice. Currently, no beverage machines are accessible to elementary students.

This CCBOE initiative meets the requirements of the new state regulations for food made available to children in our schools. We share in the community’s concern about nutrition, unhealthy eating habits, and childhood obesity. While the schools are not totally responsible for what children eat, we can do our part to point them in much healthier directions that will benefit them throughout their lives.

We are requiring all campuses to eliminate unhealthy foods-which the United States Department of Agriculture calls “foods of minimal nutritional value (FMNV).” Campuses not in compliance with state regulations will be subject to severe state penalties, including reimbursement for food service accounts.

Even though our elementary school students do not have access to these foods through vending machines, we want to make sure that teachers are mindful not to distribute these unhealthy foods to students as rewards and that cafeteria do not sell them as extra snacks. It is important that your PTOs and other school organizations know that students are not to receive these foods during the school day or on field trips.

We will eliminate carbonated drinks, sugary candies, high-fat candy bars, chewing gum, and other non-nutritional food items. We will promote bottled water, milk, fruit juices, sport drinks, pretzels, nutritional granola bars, light popcorn, and additional healthy choices.

All students will benefit through this important change in their lifestyles. These healthy food choices will promote a calmer, more productive classroom environment. (Refer to the section on Restricted Food Items).

Below is the new policy for Cook County Board of Education.

Thank you for helping us lead this charge to benefit the health and well-being of our students. If you have any questions, contact the Cook County Board of Education.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

The Board recognizes that all students in grades pre-K-12 shall have opportunities, support and encouragement to be physically active on a regular basis. The district will provide physical education consistent with federal and state requirements and engage in promotion of physical activities aimed at attainment of the following goals:

• Students are given opportunities for physical activity during the school day through daily recess periods, physical education (PE) classes, walking programs, and the integration of physical activity into the academic curriculum. Primary and Elementary schools will have a minimum of 15 minutes for daily recess.

• Students are given opportunities for physical activity through a range of after school interscholastic athletic school programs and before school physical activities. The high school faculty is encouraged to include the walking trail as a part of the student and faculty daily physical activities.

• Schools work with the community to create ways for students to walk or bike safely to and from school.

• Schools encourage parents and guardians to support their children’s participation in physical activity, to be physically active role models, and to include physical activity in family events.

• Schools provide training to enable teachers, and other schools and community staff to promote enjoyable, lifelong physical activity among students.

NUTRITION STANDARDS FOR ALL FOODS AVAILABLE ON SCHOOL CAMPUS DURING THE SCHOOL DAY

The Cook Co. Board requires all our campuses to eliminate unhealthy foods which the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) calls “foods of minimal nutritional value (FMNV).” Campuses not in compliance with state regulations will be subject to severe state penalties, including reimbursement for food service accounts.

Even though our elementary school students do not have access to these foods through vending machines, we want to make sure that teachers are mindful not to distribute these unhealthy foods to students as rewards and that cafeteria do not sell them as extra snacks. It is important that your PTO and other school organizations know that students are not to receive these foods during the school day or on field trips.

• The school district sets guidelines for foods and beverages in a la carte sales in the food service programs at Cook Middle School and Cook High School.

• The school district sets guidelines for foods and beverages sold in vending machines, snack bars, and concession stands on school campuses during school hours. No carbonated drinks are allowed and all vending machines must meet the guidelines for minimal nutritional values.

• The school district sets guidelines for foods and beverages sold as part of school-sponsored fundraising activities. We will still allow the sales of candy, cookie dough, etc. However, these items must be delivered after school hours.

• The school district sets guidelines for refreshments served at parties, celebrations, and meetings during the school day. Principals will encourage parents to bring in healthy choices for school parties. No carbonated beverages will be allowed at these parties. We suggest fruits be readily available at parties. Refer to Student Health Services
Vending Machine Policy Section
paragraph 3 related to parties.

• The school district makes decisions on these guidelines based on nutrition goals, not on profit making.

NUTRITION EDUCATION

It is the intent of the Cook County Board that the district shall teach, encourage and support healthy eating by students. Schools shall provide nutrition education consistent with federal and state requirements and engage in nutrition promotion aimed at attainment of the following goals:

• Students in grades pre-K-12 receive nutrition education that is interactive and teaches the skills they need to adopt healthy eating behaviors.

• Nutrition education is offered in the school dining room as well as in the classroom, with coordination between the foodservice staff and teachers.

• Students receive consistent nutrition messages throughout schools, classrooms, cafeterias, homes, community and media.

• District health education curriculum standards and guidelines include both nutrition and physical education.

• Nutrition is integrated into the health education curricula or core curriculum (e.g., math, science, language arts).

• Schools link nutrition education activities with the coordinated school health program.

• Staffs that provide nutrition education have appropriate training.

• Schools are enrolled as Team Nutrition Schools, and they conduct nutrition education activities and promotions that involve parents, students, and the community.

OTHER SCHOOL-BASED ACTIVITIES

The superintendent or designee shall develop procedures that promote attainment of the following goals related to other school-based activities to promote wellness:

• School district will provide a clean, safe, enjoyable meal environment for students.

• School district will schedule lunch time as near the middle of the school day as possible.

• School district will prohibit the use of food as a reward or punishment in schools.
Withholding physical activity or recess as punishment is strongly discouraged.

• School district will make efforts to keep school or district-owned physical activity facilities open for use by students outside school hours.

Student Health Services
Vending Machine Policy

How the Healthy Foods for Beverage and Snack Machines policy affects Parents, PTA's, Booster Clubs, and School Organizations

Recently, the CCBOE, Superintendent, took the initiative to support the health and academic excellence of every child in the district by changing the content of school meals and vending machines to offer more nutritious choices to students.

Under their Initiative for Healthy Children, CCBOE also prohibited the sale or distribution of "Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value," (FMNV'S) during the school day, at all grade levels. The items on this USDA list are limited to: carbonated beverages, water ices not made with 10% fruit juice, chewing gum products, hard candies, jellies and gums, candy coated popcorn, marshmallow candies, licorice, and cotton candy.
Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value cannot be sold or distributed to students during the school day. This rule does not apply to after school events like carnivals. It does apply to school parties, but cupcakes, cookies, Kool-Aid, and a host of other "fun" party foods are not considered by the USDA to be FMNV's. Pizza parties are not affected, nor are fundraising efforts, so long as they do not include the sale of Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value until after the end of the school day. Your child can bring a Food of Minimal Nutritional Value, but they are not able to share or give away to another student(s) or class.

You can support the District Initiative for Healthy Children by choosing healthier foods or non-food items for fundraising efforts. It is important to educate our children about the importance of good nutrition both at home and at school. To access additional information and resources on foods of minimal nutritional values go to: Team Nutrition at http://www.fns.usda.gov/tn.

Restricted Food Policy

Federal regulations prohibit the sale of certain foods, determined to be of minimal nutritional value, in the foodservice area during meal periods.

Restricted Foods
The foods that are restricted from sale to students are classified in these four categories:

• Soda Water -any carbonated beverage. No product shall be excluded from this definition because it contains discrete nutrients added to the food such as vitamins, minerals, and protein.

• Water Ices -any frozen, sweetened water such as "...sicles" and flavored ice with the exception of products that contain fruit or fruit juice.

• Chewing Gum -any flavored products from natural or synthetic gums and other ingredients that form an insoluble mass for chewing.

• Certain Candies -any processed foods made predominantly from sweeteners or artificial sweeteners with a variety of minor ingredients that characterize the following types:
o Hard Candy-A product made predominantly from sugar (sucrose) and corn syrup that may be flavored and colored, is characterized by a hard, brittle texture and includes such items as sour balls, lollipops, fruit balls, candy sticks, starlight mints, after dinner mints, jaw breakers, sugar wafers, rock candy, cinnamon candies, breath mints, and cough drops.

o Jellies and Gums-A mixture of carbohydrates that are combined to form a stable gelatinous system of jellylike character and are generally flavored and colored, and include gum drops, jelly beans, jellied and fruit-flavored slices.

o Marshmallow Candies-An aerated confection composed of sugar, corn syrup, invert sugar, 20 percent water, and gelatin or egg white to which flavors and colors may be added.

o Fondant-A product consisting of microscopic-sized sugar crystals that are separated by a thin film of sugar and/or invert sugar in solution such as candy corn, soft mints.

o Licorice-A product made predominantly from sugar and corn syrup that is flavored with an extract made from the licorice root.

o Spun Candy-A product that is made from sugar that has been boiled at high temperature and spun at a high speed in a special machine.

o Candy Coated Popcorn-Popcorn that is coated with a mixture made predominantly from sugar and corn syrup.

 

Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Division - Suggestions for Nutritious Snacks

Beverages
• Fruit juices
• Fruit smoothies
• Milk, non-fat or low-fat, plain or flavored
• Approved sparkling or plain water

Low-fat Grain Foods
• Mini-bagel bread sticks
• Animal crackers
• Graham crackers
• Soft pretzel, plain or flavored
• English muffin
• Hard Pretzels
• Mini rice cakes, flavored
• Low-fat sports bars
• Fig Newton’s
• Baked tortilla chips with salsa
• Low-fat fruit or grain muffin (3 oz)
• Vanilla wafers
• Dry cereal, individual servings

Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
• In-season, fresh fruit
• Carrots, broccoli, cauliflower with low-fat dip or salad dressing

Additional Treats
• 100% fruit snacks
• Fruit bars
• Frozen low-fat yogurt
• Frozen fruit bars
• Low-fat pudding, plain
• Fat free popcorn or as a parfait
• Beef jerky - 95% fat free
• Yogurt splits (yogurt, banana, peanut butter, and crackers with toppings) or parfaits
• Low-fat string cheese
• Low-fat sandwich cookies
• Fruit, nut and/or grain trail mixes
• (chocolate or vanilla)

Entrée Suggestions for School Parties
• Salads made with pasta, meat,
• Bean burrito and/or vegetables
• Grilled or baked vegetable or cheese quesadilla
• Pasta with marinara sauce
• Sub sandwiches
• Pizza bagels (or English muffins)
• Tortilla wraps filled with meat and/or vegetables
• Baked potato with vegetable or chili topping

Non-Food Reward Ideas
• Pencils, Erasers, Stars
• Stickers, Certificates
• Coupons for extra computer time, Rulers
• Free time, reading time, etc.
• Movie coupons 

Summary of District Regulations

  • All CCBOE schools may not serve or provide access for students to Foods of Minimal Nutritional Value (FMNV) or carbonated beverages at any time anywhere on school premises during the school day.
  • FMNV and carbonated beverages may not be sold or given away on school premises by the school or non-school organizations (PTO groups, fundraisers, booster clubs, etc.), teachers, parents, or any other person or group during the school day.
  • Vending machines do not have to be removed or relocated if they are stocked with appropriate healthy choices.
  • A student may bring FMNV or beverages from home as long as the student is not selling, or providing the items to other students.
  • FMNV and beverages may not be made available to students on field trips.
  • The policy does not include sports drinks, tea, or juices. The policy only covers prohibited carbonated beverages and foods of minimal nutritional value.



Cook County Board of Education
Wellness Plan



The Wellness Plan will be revised according to State Department of Education requirements as needed.

April 10, 2006
This institution is an equal opportunity provider.